Acquisition Highlights

  • Posted on: Monday, 24 April 2017 - 3:05pm
    Princeton University Library’s Department of Rare Books and Special Collections is pleased to announce the acquisition of the most significant specimen of the ‘Gutenberg Bible’ discovered during this century. This single leaf printed on vellum (calfskin) is a remarkable survival from what is widely...
  • Posted on: Friday, 31 March 2017 - 1:39pm
      Two of the most famous surviving medieval ceremonial mantles, the so-called “Star Mantle” of the Holy Roman Emperor Henry II and the Coronation Mantle of the Kings of Hungary, both embroidered in the early eleventh century, are the subjects of monographs published in the same year – 1754 – by...
  • Posted on: Monday, 16 January 2017 - 2:43pm
    Cover of Hanga, issue #3, 1924 featuring the print: Landscape with Warhouse (Warehouse) by Fukazawa Sakuichi (1896-1947)   At the beginning of the 20th century, shortly after the Japanese woodblock print began to influence Western painting and decoration, modern European art and new ideas about the...
  • Posted on: Tuesday, 17 November 2015 - 2:25pm
    The Family of Charles Patin (1684). Joseph Juster (active ca. 1690) after the painting by Noël Jouvenet (died 1698).   Title page of Pitture scelte... (1691). Marquand Library recently acquired a copy of one of the earliest publications of art-historical scholarship by a female scholar, Charlotte...
  • Posted on: Monday, 9 November 2015 - 11:57am
    On display in Marquand Library is one of the earliest publications of art-historical criticism by a female scholar, Charlotte Catherine Patin (1672?-1744). Described by a recent critic as an “imaginary museum,” Pitture scelte e dichiarate da Carla Caterina Patina, parigina accademica(1691) is an...
  • Posted on: Friday, 18 September 2015 - 11:33am
    In the words of its author and illustrator, Utagawa Toyokuni, ‘Ehon imayō sugata is a book about women of all kinds: from women of noble birth to those of the lowest classes—from the most virtuous women to the most immoral.’ Specifically, these are Toyokuni’s depictions of the modern women of early...
  • Posted on: Saturday, 7 February 2015 - 12:00am
    Jacopo (sometimes Latinized to Jacobus) Strada, the author of this elegant volume, played a complex role in the cultural life of some of the most powerful courts in mid-sixteenth-century Europe. Born in Mantua, Strada is thought to have trained as a goldsmith in the workshop of Giulio Romano before...
  • Posted on: Wednesday, 24 December 2014 - 12:00am
    Marquand Library is the only institution on record as owning a complete 7-issue run of the Japanese serial entitled Seikigun [世紀群 Century Group]. Published and hand-distributed in 1949 and 1950 by the artist/writer organization, Seiki no kai [The Century Association], the eclectically produced...
  • Posted on: Tuesday, 16 December 2014 - 12:00am
    When we hear the word “manga” today, we think of graphic novels: stories that are dramatically narrated through pictures, often in a comic book-like format. The literal meaning of the term manga (漫画) in Japanese, however, is “curious” or “whimsical drawings,” and this was the 19th century...
  • Posted on: Tuesday, 15 July 2014 - 12:00am
    In the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, the enthusiasm for Greek and Roman antiquities was nurtured by the publication of celebrated collections of antique art. Inspired in particular by the published catalogues of Sir William Hamilton’s vase collection, Dubois-Maisonneuve produced...
  • Posted on: Monday, 24 March 2014 - 11:01am
    The Princeton University Library is pleased to announce that Peter N. Heydon, Princeton Class of 1962, has made several important gifts, which are now on view in Firestone Library’s Eighteenth-Century Window. The first is the slant-topped mahogany writing desk of British poet Elizabeth Barrett...
  • Posted on: Thursday, 5 December 2013 - 12:00am
    Sometimes referred to as the “German Vasari,” Joachim von Sandrart, born in Frankfurt, trained first as a printmaker, notably in Nuremberg, and in Prague with Aegidius Sadeler. He then studied painting from 1625 on, originally in the studio of Gerrit van Honthorst in Utrecht, where he met Rubens....
  • Posted on: Monday, 18 November 2013 - 5:42pm
    Each year, PUL trials dozens of databases and licenses many more. (See trials and new databases in the right-hand column.) Library patrons are encouraged to check out these new resources and provide the library feedback about them. Be sure to check back regularly as resources come and go with...
  • Posted on: Wednesday, 21 August 2013 - 12:00am
    Published between 1922 and 1926, Hakuyō was the monthly magazine of the Japan Photographic Art Association (Nihon Kōga Geijutsu Kyōkai), the first national Japanese organization with ‘art photography’ (geijutsu shashin) as its focus. It is within the pages of this journal that the artistic...
  • Posted on: Wednesday, 22 May 2013 - 12:00am
    Another newly acquired Japanese ehon (picture book) in the Marquand Library collection is Katsushika Hokusai’s beautiful Ehon kyōka yama mata yama [Picture Book of Comic Poems: Mountains Upon Mountains], dated 1804. Filled with humorously ironic kyōka poetry and charming views of the capital city,...
  • Posted on: Friday, 30 November 2012 - 12:00am
    Celebrating the famous prostitution district of the town of Itako, this picture/ poetry book [ehon] by Katsushika Hokusai and the poet, Fuji no Karamaro, was banned by the Japanese government in 1803, shortly after publication. The charge was violation of the sumptuary laws forbidding “luxurious...
  • Posted on: Tuesday, 9 October 2012 - 12:00am
    This year, Marquand Library acquired a copy of one of the first complete color facsimiles of the Grimani Breviary, a magnificent example of Flemish Renaissance manuscript illumination.  Monumental in size, it consists of 1,670 pages, of which around 120 are full-page miniatures of both sacred and...
  • Posted on: Wednesday, 18 July 2012 - 12:00am
    In 1734, Michel-Etienne Turgot (1690-1751), the influential provost of the merchants of Paris (a position roughly equivalent to that of the present-day Mayor), commissioned a new printed map to record and promote the city of Paris. Turgot, perhaps inspired by a set of tapestries depicting a...
  • Posted on: Wednesday, 9 May 2012 - 12:00am
    Adventure was promised to those who traveled Japan’s three hundred-mile-long Tōkaidō Road from the 17th through early 20th century. For more than three centuries illustrated books and woodblock prints created and fostered a perception that the Tōkaidō was more than a thoroughfare running alongside...
  • Posted on: Thursday, 19 April 2012 - 12:00am
    Pietro da Cortona’s Tabulae anatomicae, one of the most artistic anatomical atlases ever produced, was not published until more than 70 years after the artist’s death. Early in his career, Pietro made studies of the work of anatomists, including Nicolas Larché, whose dissections in Rome were also...
  • Posted on: Tuesday, 20 March 2012 - 12:00am
    It is said that if one natural disaster strikes, a second will occur... So begins the preface to this harrowing chronicle of disasters that took place in Japan during the first two years of the Ansei period (1854-1860). The era was beset with natural calamities: 4 major and many minor earthquakes,...
  • Posted on: Friday, 2 March 2012 - 12:00am
    The triumphal column erected by the Roman senate in 113 A.D. to celebrate the victories of the emperor Trajan (died 117) over the Dacians is one of the best-preserved monuments of Imperial Rome. A key point in the architectural program of Imperial and personal propaganda planned by the emperor for...
  • Posted on: Wednesday, 11 January 2012 - 12:00am
    Adventure was promised to those who traveled Japan’s three hundred-mile-long Tōkaidō Road from the 17th through early 20th century. For more than three centuries illustrated books and woodblock prints created and fostered a perception that the Tōkaidō was more than a thoroughfare running alongside...
  • Posted on: Thursday, 15 December 2011 - 12:00am
    In this lavishly produced woodblock-printed “picture book” from the beginning of Utamaro’s career, pictures of insects, plants, and reptiles are paired with similarly themed and humorously risqué love poems. While many people are familiar with Utamaro’s later woodblock prints of bold beautiful...
  • Posted on: Tuesday, 29 November 2011 - 12:00am
    Though it is hard to believe, this recent addition to Marquand’s rare book collection is actually a student project by Emmet Gowin—distinguished American photographer, and Professor Emeritus of Visual Arts at Princeton. It is particularly fitting that this splendid example of student work at its...
  • Posted on: Monday, 17 October 2011 - 12:00am
    In the waning years of the Yuan dynasty (1279-1368), wokou (Japanese pirates) raided the coastal provinces of eastern China with increasing regularity.  Despite suffering defeat in Shandong in 1363, raiding parties continued, pushing even farther south along the coast to Fujian Province.  The early...
  • Posted on: Monday, 17 October 2011 - 12:00am
    Increased trade and diplomatic contact with the Far East during the seventeenth century nurtured European taste for exotic goods, such as lacquer, porcelain, and patterned silks. Oriental lacquer objects, first imported into Europe in the late sixteenth century, came from Japan, China, India, and...
  • Posted on: Monday, 17 October 2011 - 12:00am
    Written over the course of forty years by three generations of the Saitō family, the Edo meisho zue is a window onto the world of Japan’s capital city during the late 18th and early 19th-centuries. The lively commentary and more than 600 illustrations by Hasegawa Settan offer the modern reader not...