Library News and Events

  • Posted on Friday, 9 November 2018 - 12:30pm
    The exhibition celebrates the 200th anniversary of the release of Mary Shelley's "Frankenstein." 
  • Posted on Monday, 29 October 2018 - 12:17pm
    This month marks the centenary of the death of a 1915 Princeton University alumnus whose name is on a unique memorial collection at Princeton University Library.
  • Posted on Wednesday, 17 October 2018 - 11:13am
    Learn how to effectively create data for users around the world. 
  • Posted on Tuesday, 16 October 2018 - 3:35pm
    A recent gift to the Princeton University Library opens a time capsule from the university's remote past. 
  • Posted on Tuesday, 16 October 2018 - 10:11am
    As part of the renovation project, Firestone Library's lobby will be closed from Oct. 29 to Nov. 5 for floor refinishing work.
  • Posted on Monday, 15 October 2018 - 4:28pm
    During Princeton University's "She Roars" conference, alumni heard stories celebrating women at Cotsen Children's Library and viewed the Miriam Y. Holden Collection, which documents women's history, in PUL's Department of Rare Books and Special Collections.
  • Posted on Thursday, 11 October 2018 - 11:51am
    Humphrey Tonkin, dedicated Esperantist, presented a rare book gift to Princeton University Library: "Unua Libro" (published in 1887).
  • Posted on Thursday, 11 October 2018 - 10:54am
    The Princeton Herald and the Princeton Recollector will now be available online via the Princeton University Library website.
  • Posted on Wednesday, 10 October 2018 - 4:01pm
    During Open Access Week, Princeton University Library will host information booths across branches; a screening of "Paywall: The Business of Scholarship;" a panel on open education resources, student learning, and social justice.
  • Posted on Monday, 8 October 2018 - 12:38pm
    To measure the effect of firm advertising expenses on household stock-portfolio choices for his job market paper, Ioannis Branikas sought data on the local exposure of investors to commercials. While micro-level data on retail stock investment was readily available to him, he needed data on sports sponsorships and retail investment in specific cities to argue that advertising has a causal relationship with households’ stock picks. Princeton University Library’s extensive resources were key to the success of his research.

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