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Steal This Post

Fifty years ago, when Steal This Book was published by Abbie Hoffman, Peter Vandevanter, Class of 1973, checked to see if the bookstore would carry it.

Who was the first African American musician to perform at Carnegie Hall?

Onward ([Chicago:] W.L. Haskell, 1903). Poster mounted on linen and framed.

Who was the first African American musician to perform at the White House?

Blind Tom Concerts at Odd Fellows’ Hall, Columbia, Thursday Evening, October 29th, ‘68. Philadelphia, 1868. Printed handbill/program. 1868. Graphic Arts Collection GAX 2021- in process.

Liberty Triumphant or The Downfall of Oppression

Attributed to Henry Dawkins (born England, active in New York, 1754-57; Philadelphia, 1757-72?; New York 1772-80), Liberty Triumphant or The Downfall of Oppression, published after December 27, 1773, but before April 1774. Engraving. 275 x 377mm.

Rethinking the Incarnation of God as a Corona Warrior

Fragment from Nisha Kumari, Incarnation of God as a Corona Warrior, 2020. Ink and acrylic on paper.

Studio Snapshots: Jarrett & Jerome Pumphrey

Today we're visiting the studio of Jarrett and Jerome Pumphrey, talented brothers with amazing combined backgrounds of creative direction, entrepreneurship, graphic design, technical writing, illustration, and fatherhood.

This Week in Princeton History for February 22-28

In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, campus proctors help local police apprehend men burning crosses in town, new transportation options draw comment, and more.

Index to Princeton’s Aubudon “Birds”

A Princeton University class is going to be using Princeton University Library’s 4 volume, double elephant copy of the Audubon/Havell Birds of America, (Oversize EX 8880.134.11e), watching as we turn the pages live through a hovercam (placed as high as possible).

Gaston or Augustus Fay?

In Early American book illustrators and wood engravers, 1670-1870 and his supplement, Sinclair Hamilton lists a 19th-century wood engraver named Gaston Fay and credits any illustration using the single name “Fay” to Gaston.

Incarnation of God as a Corona Warrior

Nisha Kumari, Detail from Incarnation of God as a Corona Warrior, 2020. Acrylic and ink on handmade paper.

The “Down South Kitchen” and Family Life in Princeton University’s Isabella McCosh Infirmary

When I wrote about the myth of slave quarters in Princeton University dormitories, there wasn’t room to tell you about the service workers who did sleep under the same roof as Princeton students for half a century.

. . . This otherness, this “Not-being-us”

In one small corner of the world, both the poem Self-Portrait in a Convex Mirror by John Ashbery (1927-2017) and the Arion Press limited edition of Mirror, published in 1984 on the poem’s ten-year anniversary, are so well-known that some would find it shocking that Prince

She Does Her Own Stunts

Once upon a quarantine, a father of two decided to haul a plastic ride-on car into the house.

This Week in Princeton History for February 15-21

In this week’s installment of our recurring series bringing you the history of Princeton University and its faculty, students, and alumni, the Class of 1899 dons mourning clothes, protesters urge an end to sweatshop labor, and more.

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