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This Week in Princeton History for June 19-25

In this week’s installment of our recurring series, a young alum succumbs to cancer, a Londoner seeks to donate to a fledgling North American college, and more. June 20, 1967—Former athlete Daniel M. Sachs ’60 dies of cancer at the age of 28.

Proofs of Pine’s Horace (1731-1733)

Princeton is fortunate to own what are the only recorded marked-up proof pages from one of the most famous illustrated engraved books of eighteenth-century England, commonly known as Pine’s Horace published in London, 1733-1737.   [For full details about Pine’s Horace …

Happily Ever After: Cinderella Meets the Masters of Marketing

East of the sun or west of the moon, Cinderella is probably the best known fairy tale in the world.  And her story has been co-opted by shrewd businessmen looking to sell their wares.  Three creative examples of advertising ephemera …

Tiger Tales

It's story time, and this sweet tiger is eager to read! Best of all, the book is all about your favorite things. It's art and autobiography, mixed into one!

This Week in Princeton History for June 12-18

In this week’s installment of our recurring series, a new library has opened, bathing facilities are available, and more. June 13, 1970—Because Princeton University has taken over the building, the Princeton Inn will close today. It’s longest-residing guest, J. S.

Characters from the Popular Stage in a Deck of Handmade Cards

Strange things are shelved in the Cotsen manuscripts section.  It’s unclear what  exactly they are, why they were made, and who made them.   When the object has no obvious clues that might set off a chase, some of their secrets …

This Week in Princeton History for June 5-11

In this week’s installment of our recurring series, the baseball team has a disappointing loss, Georgia residents resolve to tar and feather an alum, and more.

Fortune at Your Fingertips

Needing some answers? No problem! We tested this set of Mystical Fortune Teller pencils offered by Snifty. Yes, for a mere $10, you have the opportunity for 10 unique answers to your most burning queries.

“Who’s Got Game: Poppy or the Snake:” Toni and Slade Morrison’s Retelling of Aesop

The terse Aesopian fable “The Man and the Snake” (Perry 176) warns that assuming the best of someone unlikely to return a favor is a risky business.

This Week in Princeton History for May 29-June 4

In this week’s installment of our recurring series, students attempt to address the problem of “Shenanigagging,” a veteran proposes a memorial, and more.

Love is All You Need :)

What do you do when your friends need some support? You make room for them of course! We had an awesome visit from author & illustrator Barbara Valenza, who shared her book and brought a VERY special stuffed friend with her!

This Week in Princeton History for May 22-28

In this week’s installment of our recurring series, a decision made by the Bric-a-Brac is controversial, an anonymous donor gives $5 million, and more.

Heads, Bodies, Legs: A Handmade Version from the early 1800s

Heads, Bodies, Legs is a chain game for three that requires pencil and paper.   The group is supposed to produce a drawing together without any player seeing what the others have created.

Family, Art & Words: The Legacy of Toni and Slade Morrison’s Children’s Books

Just posted! A special edition BiblioFiles with Dr. Dana and co-host Dr. Jennifer Garcon, Librarian for Modern & Contemporary Special Collections, Princeton University Library.

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