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Book Bouquet

The countdown to spring has begun, and we wanted to usher in the flowers with this  awesome bouquet project!

This Week in Princeton History for March 7-13

In this week’s installment of our recurring series, locals take note of the Gold Rush, the Emperor of Japan honors an alum, and more.

A Rare Print Makes A Poor Fan But A Great Find!

I came across the above item while rummaging through a box of unprocessed prints. I was immediately struck by the unusual semi-circle shape of the paper.

Myth Busters

This week, Katie challenged her Greek mythology knowledge with an at-home escape room worthy of Olympus! And given it took six hours to complete, I'm going to applaud her...shall we say...Herculean efforts (ooooo bad joke! baaaaad joke)! OK Katie, take it away!

This Week in Princeton History for February 28-March 6

In this week’s installment of our recurring series, an honorary degree is controversial, students fear smallpox, and more.

Laura Ingalls Wilder’s The Long Winter Imperfectly Remembered

On snowy weekends, details from The Long Winter, my favorite Little House book, often pop into mind.

That’s a Big Bunny

It's a simple DIY projector that creates an enormous shadow friend! All you need is a sheet of paper, an oatmeal container, and a cell phone flashlight.

This Week in Princeton History for February 21-27

In this week’s installment of our recurring series, Abraham Lincoln disappoints students, the chief of staff for the Black Panthers speaks in Dillon Gym, and more.

This Week in Princeton History for February 14-20

In this week’s installment of our recurring series, Paul Pry insults New Jersey, student journalists interview the “sphinx of Watergate,” and more.

C is for Cotsen

It's time for the annual #ColorOurCollections, hosted by the New York Academy of Medicine! Each year libraries, archives, and cultural institutions around the world share free coloring sheets based on their collections.

This Week in Princeton History for February 7-13

In this week’s installment of our recurring series, a junior defends the disproportionate number of Jews rejected in the Bicker process, students complain about seating arrangements in lecture halls, and more.

A Shaggy Dog Story’s Best for Winter: Neil Gaiman’s Fortunately the Milk

More dreary weather forecast for the Northeast this week…   Time for a tale to lift the spirits that’s completely unbelievable with illustrations to match, a pretty rousing collaboration between Neil Gaiman and Chris Riddell.

Caught Between Tradition and Transformation: Princeton University’s Black Athletes in 1985

Princeton University is an institution self-consciously steeped in tradition, sometimes to an extent that even relatively recent innovations can feel like they’ve been going on for centuries.

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