Princeton University History

Collections with Divisional Holdings

  • Office of Human Resources Records

    Consists of the records of the Office of Human Resources. Included are policy and procedure manuals, employment studies, administrative salary reviews, pension plan reports, and information on the University's unemployment policy.

  • Historical Photograph Collection, Student Photographers Series

    With the introduction of the Kodak box camera in 1888, many students began to take their own photographs. Princeton students were taking and possibly developing their own photographs on campus as early as the 1870s and early 1880s, perhaps in the darkrooms in the John C. Green School of Science.The photographs in the Student Photographers Series comprise what must be a small proportion of the photographs taken by Princeton students in the late nineteenth century.

  • Society of the Claw Records

    Consists of records that describe the brief history of the Society of the Claw. Included are minutes, correspondence, annual reports, financial records, membership lists, rules and regulations, certificates and a variety of printed materials. The tiger claws owned by the Archives have been removed to the ephemera collection.

  • Gauss Seminars in Criticism Records

    The collection is composed of correspondence with the guest speakers. Most folders contain a letter of invitation to speak at the Gauss Seminars, correspondence concerning presentation dates, lodging, and material for distribution during the presentation. Other items include payment for lectures and correspondence requesting additional lecture dates at other institutions during the speaker's stay in the United States.The final folder contains material from a symposium on the subject of Thomas Mann's Dr. Faustus.

  • Princeton University Printed Materials Collection

    The Princeton University Printed Materials Collection is made up of programs, small newsletters, brochures, announcements and ephemera that are issued by University offices, departments and programs as well as by student organizations. For the most part, these items arrive at the University Archives through the campus mail on a daily basis throughout the year.

  • Davis International Center records

    The collection documents the Center's programs and events, as well as international student associations and alumni groups. Types of documents include reports, correspondence, publicity materials, and meeting minutes.

  • Princeton University at Exposition Universelle Internationale Records

    The collection includes photographs, graphic charts, and wall labels used in the
    exhibition, as well as an official certificate awarded to Princeton University for
    its exhibition.

  • Broadcast Center Recordings

    The collection includes over 2,300 video recordings of Princeton related lectures, conferences, symposia, events, ceremonies and creative works. These recording feature a variety of speakers, including politicians, celebrities, activists, as well as scholars and professors from Princeton and around the world. Topics include religion, finance, gender, technology, philosophy, science, sports, and other issues. Also included is a series of Campus Shots, which capture daily life at Princeton through documenting various activities on campus.

  • Princeton Alumni Weekly Oral History Project Records

    The collection consists of interviews of eleven members of the Class of 1962 during their 50th reunion in May and June of 2012. The alumni converse about Princeton during their time on campus including its social life, academics and student activities. The collection includes transcripts (Microsoft Word documents and PDFs); videos (on DVD) and audio files (on DVD) of the interviews. All interviews were conducted by Princeton Alumni Weekly staff member Brett Tomlinson.

  • Master's Theses Collection

    This collection consists of theses submitted toward the fulfillment of requirements for master's degrees at Princeton University. While Princeton students who write doctoral dissertations and senior theses are required to deposit copies of their work with the University Library, a student who completes a master's thesis may choose whether or not to deposit it with the library. Therefore, this collection does not represent all master's theses written at Princeton University.

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