Princeton University History

Collections with Divisional Holdings

  • Veterans of Future Wars Collection

    Consists of records of the Veterans of Future Wars, founded by Princeton University undergraduates Lewis Gorin (Class of 1936), Jack Turner (Class of 1936), Thomas Riggs (Class of 1937), and Robert Barnes (Class of 1937). The collections consists primarily of correspondence of the National Council members (the founding Princeton students), the organization's nation-wide posts, and its various auxiliary support groups.

  • Don Oberdorfer Papers on Princeton University: The First 250 Years

    Consists of notes and photocopies of articles used as research materials for PRINCETON UNIVERSITY: THE FIRST 250 YEARS (1995). Included in the collection is a transcript of an interview with former president William G. Bowen, and a 1994 administrative and academic self-study of the University.

  • Seminar on Research in Progress Papers

    The collection consists of papers produced by department faculty and doctoral
    candidates as part of the Department of Economics' Seminar on Research in Progress.
    The papers typically combine theoretical approaches to economics with statistical
    analysis and practical research. A contributor on several of the papers is Harold T.
    Shapiro, who would in later years go on to become president of the University.

  • Princetoniana Collection

    The Princetoniana Collection is a set of over 1000 books, manuscripts, pamphlets, papers, and other collected materials relating to Princeton University. Nearly every aspect of the University's life from the time of its founding to the modern era is represented to some degree in the Princetoniana Collection. Historical surveys, biographies, and University releases such as the Official Register and the Nassau Herald are all represented in the Princetoniana Collection.

  • Council of the Princeton University Community Records

    Material in the collections consists of minutes of meetings, reports, and correspondence produced by CPUC and its subsidiary committees. In addition, transcripts of judicial hearings as well as accompanying audio tapes of the hearings are included.

  • Princeton University Federal Credit Union Records

    Consists of the organizational records of the Princeton University Federal Credit Union including meeting minutes, financial audits, memos, policies, and committee reports.

  • Office of the President Records : Jonathan Dickinson to Harold W. Dodds Subgroup

    The content of this collection varies markedly over time. The eighteenth and
    early nineteenth-century presidents' records are typically secondary sources
    such as clippings or letters written by others, most of which long postdate the
    lifetimes of the men to whom they refer. In a few instances, primary material in
    the form of correspondence, financial records, and sermons exists. The early

  • Athletic Programs Collection

    Consists of printed Princeton University athletic programs for football, baseball, basketball, ice hockey, and other sports, with football predominant. †b The programs, especially the earlier ones, provide a sweeping view of Princeton's athletic history, documenting not only team statistics and scores, but the players, the venues in which the teams competed, social aspects of advertising, and the evolution of the various games. Other sports represented in this collection include fencing, gymnastics, lacrosse, rowing, soccer, squash, swimming, tennis, track, volleyball, and wrestling.

  • John Rupert Martin Papers

    Consists of Martin's correspondence and his handwritten lecture notes from courses taught as well as his lecture appointments at other institutions. Much of the correspondence is with fellow art historians and deals with scholarly matters, including one letter from Irwin Panofsky.

  • Hikoichi Orita Diary

    The diary is photocopied in two volumes. The first volume dates from January 1, 1872 to December 31, 1873 and the second, from January 1, 1874 to December 31, 1876. The handwritten entries are for the most part quite legible and written in English, but the memoranda, which are placed at the end of each year, are written in Japanese. There are also listings of bills and accounts by month.Generally, the entries are brief.

Pages

Pssst...

You are currently only seeing content in the Princeton University Archives. You can also explore Princeton University History material in all divisions.