Princeton University History

Collections with Divisional Holdings

  • Steward and Refectory Records

    Consists of records relating to various expenses incurred by 18th- and 19th-century students while at Princeton. They are divided into two groups: 1) Refectory accounts, which are predominantly lists of students and the amounts due from each for itemized expenses, including room and board, tuition, library, servant wages, washing, damages and fuel. Other materials include bills, various accounts and reports, an inventory of furniture belonging to the kitchen in 1816, and bills, accounts and reports relating to the building of a new refectory in 1834-35.

  • Office of Dean of the Faculty Records

    The Princeton University Office of the Dean of the Faculty Records consists of the files of the dean, the office's staff, as well as the faculty.

  • Program in Continuing Education records

    Consists of the general records of the Program in Continuing Education, including advertisements, faculty committee minutes, fundraising reports, statistics on attendance, director's files, and scholarship applications.

  • Cyrus Fogg Brackett Lectureship Records

    The lecturer files contain correspondence, lecture manuscripts, and published lectures–although rarely all three. The other materials include lecture schedules, a biography of Professor Brackett, lists and directories of the lecturers, a scrapbook of clippings, and histories of the lectureship.

  • John Rupert Martin Papers

    Consists of Martin's correspondence and his handwritten lecture notes from courses taught as well as his lecture appointments at other institutions. Much of the correspondence is with fellow art historians and deals with scholarly matters, including one letter from Irwin Panofsky.

  • Princeton Student Aid Association records

    Consists of the minutes, financial records, by-laws, and correspondence of the
    Princeton Student Aid Association and its predecessor, the Princeton Charitable
    Institution.

  • Benjamin Franklin Bunn Papers

    This collection contains correspondence, financial reports, papers and memoranda relating to numerous Princeton University associations and organizations. The correspondence is virtually all between Bunn and his classmates, friends, and University officials, though some letters from family members are included. The most voluminous series of papers relate to the Class of 1907, The Daily Princetonian, the Princeton Triangle (the file contains a handwritten letter from F.

  • H. Hubert Wilson Collection on the Princeton University Department of Politics

    The collection consists primarily of published sources on topics of interest to Wilson, including the administration, finances and governance of Princeton University, the activities of the Priorities Committee, government ties and sponsored research at Princeton, ROTC, and campus politics. It also contains materials originating in Wilson's teaching at Princeton, including student papers and theses, as well as drafts of a publication titled \This Isn't Princeton\.

  • Willis M. Rivinus Papers on the Sally Frank case

    Consists of research materials gathered by Rivinus (Princeton Class of 1950) documenting the legal case of ’Sally Frank v. Ivy Club, University Cottage Club, Tiger Inn and the Trustees of Princeton University’, which was formally begun in 1979 and continues to the present (1991). Included in the Papers are correspondence (1986-1988), a manuscript and notes (1987-1989) for an article Rivinus authored about the case, legal briefs (1979-1989) of the case, and related newspaper clippings (1985-1991).

  • Phi Beta Kappa Records

    This collection contains reports, constitutions, by-laws, minutes, lists of
    members, and correspondence of the Princeton chapter of Phi Beta Kappa. The
    correspondence relates mostly to administrative matters – replacement of lost
    keys, membership enquiries, and invitations to various organizational
    functions.

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