Princeton University History

Collections with Divisional Holdings

  • Office of Athletic Communication Records

    The records of the Office of Athletic Communications contain programs, press releases, clippings, statistics, and files on individual athletes. In some cases these materials predate the formation of the Office of Athletic Communications; however, they were retained by the Office and transferred to the University Archives along with more recent records.Please see series descriptions in contents list for additional information about individual series.

  • Department of History records

    Consists of subject and faculty files, correspondence, departmental budgets, and
    course syllabi. Also included in the collection are statistical forms of 19th
    century Princeton alumni compiled for a research project by the Shelby Cullom
    Davis Center for Historical Studies, records from the NDEA Institute for
    Advanced Studies in History, and records from a 1996 conference on American
    Conservatism.

  • Graduate School Records

    The Graduate School Records consist of minutes, correspondence, reports,
    writings, applications, surveys, and memoranda, as well as forms, course
    listings, and information on examinations and fees. The Deans' subject files
    make up a large part of the collection. Dean Andrew Fleming West's records,
    including his writings, correspondence, and in particular his scrapbooks, make
    up a substantial portion of this collection as well.

  • Triangle Club Records

    The Triangle Club Records can be used not only to document the performances and business activities of one of the oldest college theatre groups in the country, but also to examine an aspect of student life as it relates to politics, social customs, and student mores. In its one-hundred-plus-year history, Triangle has spoofed perennial Princeton topics such as classroom etiquette, examinations, dating, living arrangements, and dining, as well as broader topics such as women's rights, Vietnam, Watergate, and academic trends.

  • Cleveland Memorial Tower Visitor Logs collection

    Consists of 11 log books signed by visitors to the Cleveland Memorial Tower.

  • Princeton Publishing Company records

    Consists of records which document the activities of the Princeton Publishing Company. The bulk of the material is related to finance, and includes stock certificates, ledger books, deeds, and bills of sales. A complete set of annual meeting minutes is also included, however these too pertain primarily to financial matters.

  • Quipfire! Records

    The records contain promotional material, performances and founding documents for Quipfire! Included are posters, programs, photograph albums, slides, a team hat and VHS recordings of three of the group's first four performances, as well as a promotional tape.

  • Alumni Organization records

    Consists primarily of administrative materials such as correspondence, meeting minutes, notebooks and reports belonging to both national and regional associations and their committees, most from the first half of the 20th century. Also contains newsletters, alumni directories, scrapbooks, photographs, and materials documenting reunions and alumni organization activities from the late 19th century forward.

  • The Papers of Thomas Jefferson Project Editor's Records

    The collection documents the Thomas Jefferson Papers Project from its conception and initial proposal in 1943 until the death of its first editor Julian P. Boyd in 1980. Contained in the records is correspondence with Princeton presidents Harold T. Dodds and Robert F. Goheen, who were active advisors in the early years of the project. Other notable correspondence is with Jefferson scholars, board members of the New York Times, and Jefferson Papers Project advisory board members. Also included are financial records, including Boyd's original cost estimations for the project.

  • James Penrose Harland papers

    From the time he was 15 years old until several years before his death in 1973, James Penrose Harland maintained a diary, journal, or daily log in which he recorded a few notes about each day's events. These yearly volumes, written in his own hand, comprise the bulk of the collection. Also included are clippings, photographs, postcards, and some correspondence.

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