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Cold War

Includes collections documenting Cold War policies and international relations. Of Special interest are collections relating to the Office of Strategic Services and the Central Intelligence Agency, Allen and John Foster Dulles, George Kennan, James Forrestal, and Hamilton Fish Armstrong, among others.

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European history

  • French Revolution Collection

    The collection consists of selected correspondence, manuscripts, and documents from the time of the French Revolution. Correspondents include A. M. Marron, Gilbert Romme, and other French officials, such as the minister of public safety, the minister of justice, the minister of weights and measures, and the minister of public works. The documents include arrest warrants, paper currency, bills, receipts, certificates of citizenship, and accounts. The manuscripts Include a signed copy of "Hymne pour la Fédération Française en 1792", in verse, which is an unpublished variant of Chénier's "Chant du 14 Juillet, 1790." Also included is an English copy of a French narrative of the treatment experiences by the French deporté transported from Rochefort to Cayenne, dated Sept. 30, 1798. The collection also includes an incomplete, original, holograph manuscript in the hand of the French Revolutionary journalist and pamphleteer Camille Desmoulins, written for one of his celebrated periodicals, the " Revolutions de France et de Brabant or the Vieux Cordelier. The document refers to one of the most significant events of the early period of the Revolution, the assembly at the Champ de Mars, which took place on July 14, 1790.

  • F. Scott Fitzgerald Additional Papers

    The collection onsists of additional (i.e., in addition to the F. ScottFitzgerald Papers) writings, including published juvenilia, letters, documents,photographs, tape recordings, and memorabilia of Fitzgerald (Princeton Class of1917), and material of others about him. Included are 7 boxes of paperspresented by several of Fitzgerald's friends of the 1930s and 1940: Bertie Barr, Esquire magazine, which published many of thePat Hobby stories, Sheilah Graham, Laura Guthrie Hearne, and Marie Shank. Thereare also two film versions of Tender Is the Night,David Hertz' screenplay (1947) and that of Ivan Moffat (1961).A futher addition to the collection contains 32 letter and cards from Fitzgeraldto "Dear Patsy" (Hazel McCromack); miscellaneous correspondence to and fromScott and Zelda Fitzgerald to Francis Kroll, Matthew Bruccolli and others;correspondence related to Marie Stokes Jemison; letters sent by authors andcritics to William Goldhurst regarding Fitzgerald, including T. S. Eliot, NormanMailer, Harold Ober, and Thornton Wilder; photographs; drawings; and newspaperclippings. Also included are a photocopy of the screenplay by Harold Pinterwhich is based on Fitzgerald's last, unfinished novel The Last Tycoon and the script and film print of Marked for Glory, a film about Scott and Zelda Fitzgerald by GwinnOwens. Nine large scrapbooks of material about Fitzgerald, his life, and works,collected by daughter Scottie Fitzgerald Lanahan, complete the collection.Occasionally, a reference is made to the following locations using theabbreviations noted below:"Published Juvenilia of F. Scott Fitzgerald, 1909-1917." A bound collection.Abbr.: "Published Juvenilia..." (Box 2, Folder 24)"Various Contributions of Scott Fitzgerald to the Nassau Literary Magazine of Princeton, 1915-1917." A bound collection.Abbr.: "Various Contributions..." (Box 2, Folder 25) "The Apprentice Fiction of F. Scott Fitzgerald, 1909-1917." Two folders ofphotocopied material. Abbr.: "The Apprentice Fiction..." (Box 3, Folders1-2)"Excerpts from the Nassau Literary Magazine -1917."A folder of photocopied material. Abbr.: "Excerpts from the Nassau..." (Box 3, Folder 3) Newman News. A folder containing Easter issues:1912, 1913. (Box 3, Folder 4)

  • George W. Storer Brazil Squadron Papers

    This collection documents much of George Washington Storer's long career in theUnited States Navy as captain, lieutenant, and commander-in-chief of the BrazilSquadron, and also offers a wide-ranging look at the role of the United StatesNavy, primarily during the 1830s and 1840s, as a peacekeeper and a deterrent tothe slave trade.Series 1, "Naval Service as Lieutenant and Captain, 1817-1845," containscorrespondence; ship information; and official United States Navy records, suchas circulars, orders, and regulations. As an officer rising in rank within theUnited States Navy, Storer corresponded with many naval officers, includingJames Biddle, John Downes, Lawrence Kearny, Charles Morris, and J.K. Paulding(Secretary of the Navy). He also corresponded with American consuls, R.M.Hamilton (Montevideo) and Alexander Lyler (Bahia). It appears that Storer tookgreat pride in his work in the Navy, creating records documenting his ownservice as well as those who served with him. For several ships on which heserved and the Portsmouth Navy Yard, there are lists of officers and crew, andorders. This material is arranged alphabetically within the series.Series 2, "Naval Service as Commander-in-Chief of Brazil Squadron, 1847-1851,"documents the many facets of the duties of the Brazil Squadron. Although itsprimary task was "protecting American interests and trade," (Canney, page 111),the Brazil Squadron tended to a variety of American interests includingdiplomacy with Brazil, Uruguay, and Argentina; and increasingly, after 1847, theenforcement of the long-standing ban on the American participation in thetrans-Atlantic slave trade. This series includes correspondence with prominentnaval officers and diplomats, information regarding ships (both United StatesNavy ships and slave ships), and a few official United States Navy records. Inregards to diplomacy, Storer corresponded with H.H. Cocke, R.M. Hamilton, W.A.Harris, Thomas J. Morgan, and David Tod, all of whom were American diplomats inSouth America. In addition, Storer became involved in a case of a British youthwho stowed away on one of his ships; a mob which attacked American citizens onthe Brazilian island of Santa Catarina; and the ongoing Siege of Montevideo.This series also includes numerous documents which relate directly to theefforts against the slave trade. Storer's 1847 initial orders from the Secretaryof the Navy, John Y. Mason, include a mandate for "the repression of the slavetrade," to "use every effort to arrest and bring to well merited punishment allpersons who on the open seas may disgrace the American flag by making it in anyway subservient to the pursuit or protection of this most nefarious commerce"(Box 2, Folder 9). Most dramatic is a long November 1848 letter from John I.Taylor reporting on the discovery of a slave trading port at Cabo Frio, Brazil(Box 2, Folder 20). Several letters describe ships that were searched orimpounded by the Americans or British, often drawing lengthy protests from theBrazilians, including files relating to the successful capture of the slaver Laurens by the USS Onkahye on January 23, 1848 (Box 3, Folder 17) and correspondenceand reports relating to suspected, and on occasion, actual slave ships Casco, Flora, Imogen, Kingston, and Paulina. The material is arrangedalphabetically within the series.Series 3, "Naval Service as Governor of the Naval Asylum at Philadelphia andPresident of the Court of Inquiry #3, 1852-1858," documents the later years ofGeorge W. Storer's naval career. For several years, Storer was on leave, but heappears to have been anxious to return to service. On July 1, 1854, he receivedorders from James C. Dobbin, Secretary of the Navy, to serve as governor of theNaval Asylum at Philadelphia, a hospital and home for retired sailors which waslocated on the Schuylkill River. During his service as governor, Storer had adispute with William H. Gordon, an officer with whom he worked, regarding Gordonnot following an order. This dispute is documented with letters from both Storerand Gordon to Dobbin. In 1857, the Secretary of the Navy, Isaac Toucey, orderedStorer to serve as president of the Court of Inquiry #3, which resulted from an1855 congressional act attempting to promote efficiency in the Navy by removingmore than two hundred officers from service. Material largely consists of ordersto testify for particular officers, but does include lists of officers affectedby the Court of Inquiry.The final series, "Personal and Family Papers, 1842-1868," contains a fewpersonal materials of George W. Storer, including correspondence about a libraryand grocery accounts, and materials belonging to his sons, Jacob J. Storer,Robert Storer, and Samuel Storer. Robert Storer served in the Navy and includedare an official leave of absence and an order, as well as a letter from hisfather. While extremely small in quantity, this series provides a more personaland intimate view of George W. Storer and his role as a father, rather than anaval officer. Of interest is a letter from Samuel Storer at the time of hiswife's death when he was in Sitka, Alaska.Works Cited: Canney, Donald L. Afica Squadron: The U.S. Navy and the Slave Trade, 1842-1861. Washington, D.C.: Potomac Books, Inc.,2006.

  • Gilbert Chinard Collection of French Historical Material

    The collection contains miscellaneous French manuscripts, correspondence, documents,photographs, and broadsides and other printed matter collected by Chinard:18th-century material of the Tarbé family, including manuscripts of poems, songs, andtheatrical works, correspondence, and printe matter of Louis-Hardouin Tarbé(1753-1806), and correspondence of his father, a Sens (France) printer; miscellaneous18th- and 19th-century papers of the Sorrel family, including letters written byAntoine-François Sorrel (1737-1830) to his father before becoming a cartographer andengineer on Saint Dominigue, West Indies; letters by the French writer Jules Claretie(1840-1913); bound manuscripts--a treatise dealing with the "respective powers andprerogatives of the royal power," a French textbook on geometry for children, and19th-century French specifications for artillery emplacements and carriages; andletters by Pope Pius VII, cardinals of the Roman Catholic Church, and archbishops ofSens.In addition, there are documents dating from the Revolutionary and Republicanperiods, including letters (1788-1797) from the French consul in Baltimore concerningpolitical and economic relations between France and Maryland; some material about theAmerican explorer John Charles Fremont, including a brief biography, a pencilportrait, and a letter by him to Alexander Vattemare; several folders of 18th-centuryLouisiana material; and about 90 letters (1699-1889) in English, mostly by minorwriters and artists.

  • Hereward Carrington Papers

    This collection consists of Carrington’s papers on spiritualism, includingcorrespondence with literary and scientific figures of the day, such as WilliamBarrett, Ernesto Bozzano, Gustave Geley, Stanley Hall, Joseph Jastrow, SinclairLewis, Eusapia Palladino, and Mrs. A. W. Verrall. Also included are photographicdocumentation of psychic phenomena, stills from the film series "The Mysteriesof Myra," several short Carrington manuscripts, and two of his diaries (1923,1930). In addition, there is a group of approximately 30 letters (1931-1940) toCarrington from a broad group of American and European psychical researchers, aswell as typed transcripts of responses from many of them supporting his proposedPsychical Laboratory and agreeing to be on its International Council.

  • Intermission, by Calvin Tomkins

    The collection consists of manuscripts of Tomkins (Princeton Class of 1947) for his first novel, Intermission (1951), including the original short story version written for R. P. Blackmur's class at Princeton in 1947, holograph and typescript drafts with a working title of ""The Wandering Rocks," and galley proofs.

  • Intermission, by Calvin Tomkins

    The collection consists of manuscripts of Tomkins (Princeton Class of 1947) for his first novel, Intermission (1951), including the original short story version written for R. P. Blackmur's class at Princeton in 1947, holograph and typescript drafts with a working title of ""The Wandering Rocks," and galley proofs.

  • James Alexander Papers

    The collection consists of correspondence, documents, and manuscripts of JamesAlexander, the bulk of which relate to the allocation of land, primarily in NewJersey, or to the legal and government problems arising from its ownership during theperiod Alexander was surveyor-general of New Jersey and, later, New York. Indiandeeds, surveys, and a "Copy of the Jersey Commission for running the Division Linebetwixt the Province of New Jersey and New York" are included, with petitions andcorrespondence regarding land riots (1740) and those arrested during land disputes,and the petition of Alexander and William Smith for reinstatement after theirdisbarment in the libel trial of printer/publisher John Peter Zenger. In addition,there are letters and documents signed by colonial governors of New York and NewJersey, including William Burnet, Robert Hunter, Edward Hyde Cornbury, CadwalladerColden, and Jonathan Belcher, as well as letters by David Ogden, and RichardStockton.

  • James Alexander Papers

    The collection consists of correspondence, documents, and manuscripts of JamesAlexander, the bulk of which relate to the allocation of land, primarily in NewJersey, or to the legal and government problems arising from its ownership during theperiod Alexander was surveyor-general of New Jersey and, later, New York. Indiandeeds, surveys, and a "Copy of the Jersey Commission for running the Division Linebetwixt the Province of New Jersey and New York" are included, with petitions andcorrespondence regarding land riots (1740) and those arrested during land disputes,and the petition of Alexander and William Smith for reinstatement after theirdisbarment in the libel trial of printer/publisher John Peter Zenger. In addition,there are letters and documents signed by colonial governors of New York and NewJersey, including William Burnet, Robert Hunter, Edward Hyde Cornbury, CadwalladerColden, and Jonathan Belcher, as well as letters by David Ogden, and RichardStockton.

  • John Butler Yeats Collection

    The collection consists of original manuscripts, drawings, correspondence, miscellaneous materials, photographs and portraits, articles, clippings, and other printed material by and related to John Butler Yeats. The bulk of the collection, however, is composed of typed transcripts of this correspondence as well as copies of other correspondence (primarily letters by and to John Quinn from the John Quinn Memorial Collection in the New York Public Library), and other research material.The manuscripts include an autograph draft of "The Last of Her Sex," typed and corrected drafts of "Extravaganza Written in Anticipation," "The Haunted House," "Jack B. Yeats," “A Painter on Painting" (which appeared in The Seven Arts, April 1917), and an untitled manuscript.The drawings consist of two pencil self-portraits, several of women, and one of an unidentified group.The original correspondence (with many of the original envelopes) from 1908 to 1922 documents Yeats's years in New York. The majority of the correspondence is by Yeats to several of his American friends, including Martha Fletcher Bellinger, Mary Tower Lapsley Caughey, Eulabee Dix (Becker), Dolly Sloan, John Sloan, Ann Squire, and others. Many of these letters are heavily illustrated with humorous sketches and drawings. Some of the envelopes addressed to Mary Tower Lapsley Caughey contain notes by her. There are also letters to Yeats by others, including his daughters Elizabeth Corbet (Lollie) Yeats and Susan Mary (Lily) Yeats, and his son Jack (John) Butler Yeats. Furthermore, there is a small selection of correspondence between various persons about Yeats.The photographs show the sitting room in Yeats's house in Dundrum, Ireland, and Anne Yeats (daughter of W. B. (William Butler) Yeats) as a young child with her nurse; and there are photographic reproductions of Yeats's portraits of Mary Tower Lapsley Caughey, Mary-Lapsley Caughey Guest, and Padraic Colum, as well as of some drawings.The miscellaneous materials consist of envelopes addressed by Yeats to Charlotte (?) Jordan and W. B. (William Butler) Yeats, a list of Yeats's articles by Elizabeth Corbet (Lollie) Yeats, a drawing with notes by Mary Tower Lapsley Caughey, a typed and corrected draft of "Memories of J. B. Yeats" by Mary-Lapsley Caughey Guest (?), a poem, "Theocritus," by Mary-Lapsley Caughey Guest, and a typed transcript of "An Incident of the British Occupation of Egypt in 1882" by Captain George Freeman (Fitzgerald) (?).The research material was compiled by William Murphy, Glenn O'Malley, and Donald Torchiana-probably used by Murphy in his research for his biography Prodigal Father: The Life of John Butler Yeats, 1839-1922 (1978), and intended for use by O'Malley and Torchiana in a publication of the correspondence of Yeats to his American friends. Included are typed transcripts and photocopies of the original correspondence by Yeats in the collection, as well as of his correspondence to Van Wyck Brooks, Robert Henri, and others. Also present are typed transcripts, photocopies, and microfilm of the correspondence of John Quinn with John Butler Yeats, Jack (John) Butler Yeats, and others from the John Quinn Memorial Collection in the New York Public Library. In addition, there are notes about the correspondence and other related material.Articles by Yeats, written while in New York, include essays, poetry, and letters to the editor. The clippings document Yeats's social circle in New York, publications of his essays and letters, interviews, various posthumous remembrances, and other related topics. The other printed material includes miscellaneous publications about Yeats and Jack (John) Butler Yeats.

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