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Soviet Children's Books

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Research Tools for Printed Material (Books, Maps, Prints, etc.)

Publishing History

  • John Everett Millais Letters to His Daughter Effie

    The collection consists of a series of over forty autograph letters signed byMillais to his daughter Effie, prefaced by a poem "To Effie" opening "O for thedays when her schooling is over"; plus an autograph letter to her father-in-law,Judge Sir William James, two studio photographs of Millais, a signed Carted'Exposant for the Exposition Universelle de 1878, and a lock of Millais's hair("cut off at Birnam, October 1874""). A number of the letters bear pen-and-inksketches; others address his paintings. Disbound from the original volume(covers retained, titled "Millais' Letters to his Daughter Effie"). Severalsignatures have been excised, a few letters are incomplete, and one apparentlywas removed from the album at an early date. The letters date from Kensington,Perthshire, and elsewhere.

  • Joseph Howard Scrapbooks

    Consists of Howard's scrapbooks of press clippings of articles he wrote over the years for several New York City newspapers -- The Sun, The New York Herald, The New York Recorder, and The Star -- often writing under the heading "Howard's Column," Howard's Letter," and "Howard's Gossip," or under the byline "Jugg." The scrapbooks include some letters, photographs, and memorabilia.

  • Joseph Howard Scrapbooks

    Consists of Howard's scrapbooks of press clippings of articles he wrote over the years for several New York City newspapers -- The Sun, The New York Herald, The New York Recorder, and The Star -- often writing under the heading "Howard's Column," Howard's Letter," and "Howard's Gossip," or under the byline "Jugg." The scrapbooks include some letters, photographs, and memorabilia.

  • Joseph Howard Scrapbooks

    Consists of Howard's scrapbooks of press clippings of articles he wrote over the years for several New York City newspapers -- The Sun, The New York Herald, The New York Recorder, and The Star -- often writing under the heading "Howard's Column," Howard's Letter," and "Howard's Gossip," or under the byline "Jugg." The scrapbooks include some letters, photographs, and memorabilia.

  • José Donoso Papers

    The collection consists of personal papers of Donoso, the man and the writer.Included are typescript drafts of several of his major works, Este domingo, El obsceno pájaro de la noche, Historia personal del "boom", " Tres novelitas burguesas, Casa de campo, and La desesperanza; correspondence from family members,publishers, and literary friends, such as Latin American writers Carlos Fuentes,Ernesto Sábato, Gustavo Sainz, Mario Vargas Llosa, and Gabriel García Márquez,Donoso's literary agent Carmen Balcells, and filmmaker Luis Buñuel; manuscripts ofshort stories, articles, speeches and lectures, plays and screenplays; and materialabout Donoso, such as interviews, essays, newspaper clippings, and a filmscript onhis life.Also included are Donoso's notebooks, numbered 34-50 and 52-64, covering (with gaps)the period from 7 January 1966 to 25 August 1978. They afford the reader severalperspectives of Donoso's creative life—literary, biographical, andsociological—capturing and refining the author's ideas before and after the actualcomposition of the drafts, providing allusions to other works and occasional criticalcomments, and illuminating the problems and advantages created by exile, the socialenvironment of exiled Latin American writers, and, sometimes, the author's reactionsto certain political events.Furthermore, there is a small selection of miscellaneous material, including awards,photographs, contracts and correspondence of his wife, María Pilar Serrano.

  • Julian Street Papers

    The collection contains correspondence, manuscripts, photographs, and notes, bothpublished and unpublished, of Julian Street, ranging from his early reporter anddrama critic days (1900-1910) up to the page of Table Topics he was working on just before his death (1947). Included aretypescripts, manuscript notes, and proofs for 6 nonfiction works, 4 novels, 21scripts, approximately 88 articles, plus the series of articles for Table Topics (which was a publication of Bellows &Co.), approximately 58 short stories, speeches, poems, and anecdotes and memoirssaved for a biography which was never written. Most notable are American Adventures, Table Topics, When We Were Rather Young, The Country Cousin, Rita Coventry, and "Mr.Bisbee's Princess."The large body of correspondence includes many authors and prominent people of theperiod, such as Willa Cather, Clarence Darrow, Maude Howe Elliot, Edna Ferber, W.C.Fields, several Roosevelts, and Booth Tarkington. Letters of family and friendsinclude Margaret Kennedy Davies, Robert Sawyer, Francis Marshall, and KennethWhistler Street. In addition, there is an extensive subject file of material in theform of notes, clippings, pamphlets, etc., relating to Street's writings, as well asjournals, wine-tasting scrapbooks, photographs, documents, tearsheets of his works,and printed matter about food and wine with menus and wine lists. Also mentionableare Street's diploma from the "Legion of Honor" in France and photographs of theStreets, George Ade, Jerome Kern, Theodore Roosevelt, Booth Tarkington, andothers.Papers of other persons consist of Margot Street's correspondence after 1947 and theworks and letters of Ellis P. Butler, Irvin Cobb, Matthew P. Andrews, Karen Aptakin(author of the senior thesis Change and Constancy: A Literary Biography of Julian Street and Booth Tarkington), Auguste Escoffier,caricatures by James Montgomery Flagg, Hubert Osborne's dramatization of Street'scomedy Rita Coventry, and others.A lantern slide projector with glass slides taken by Street on a trip to Japan (ca.1920) have been transferred to the Visual Materials Division.

  • Julian Street Papers

    The collection contains correspondence, manuscripts, photographs, and notes, bothpublished and unpublished, of Julian Street, ranging from his early reporter anddrama critic days (1900-1910) up to the page of Table Topics he was working on just before his death (1947). Included aretypescripts, manuscript notes, and proofs for 6 nonfiction works, 4 novels, 21scripts, approximately 88 articles, plus the series of articles for Table Topics (which was a publication of Bellows &Co.), approximately 58 short stories, speeches, poems, and anecdotes and memoirssaved for a biography which was never written. Most notable are American Adventures, Table Topics, When We Were Rather Young, The Country Cousin, Rita Coventry, and "Mr.Bisbee's Princess."The large body of correspondence includes many authors and prominent people of theperiod, such as Willa Cather, Clarence Darrow, Maude Howe Elliot, Edna Ferber, W.C.Fields, several Roosevelts, and Booth Tarkington. Letters of family and friendsinclude Margaret Kennedy Davies, Robert Sawyer, Francis Marshall, and KennethWhistler Street. In addition, there is an extensive subject file of material in theform of notes, clippings, pamphlets, etc., relating to Street's writings, as well asjournals, wine-tasting scrapbooks, photographs, documents, tearsheets of his works,and printed matter about food and wine with menus and wine lists. Also mentionableare Street's diploma from the "Legion of Honor" in France and photographs of theStreets, George Ade, Jerome Kern, Theodore Roosevelt, Booth Tarkington, andothers.Papers of other persons consist of Margot Street's correspondence after 1947 and theworks and letters of Ellis P. Butler, Irvin Cobb, Matthew P. Andrews, Karen Aptakin(author of the senior thesis Change and Constancy: A Literary Biography of Julian Street and Booth Tarkington), Auguste Escoffier,caricatures by James Montgomery Flagg, Hubert Osborne's dramatization of Street'scomedy Rita Coventry, and others.A lantern slide projector with glass slides taken by Street on a trip to Japan (ca.1920) have been transferred to the Visual Materials Division.

  • Leo Tolstoy Collection

    The collection consists of correspondence by and about Tolstoy, a portrait of Tolstoy, and a copy of Tolstoy's Kreĭt︠s︡erova sonata. There is a signed autograph letter from Tolstoy to Benedict L. Prieth, Princeton Class of 1891, dated January 30 - February 12, 1907, concerning the death of Ernest Howard Crosby, the American author and friend of Tolstoy. The letter is written in English from his father's estate, "Yasnaya Polyana"" There are two other letters regarding Tolstoy's letter to Prieth. The first is from Eberhard L. Faber, Princeton Class of 1915, dated November 20, 1925. In his letter, Faber forwards to his uncle, Benedict Prieth, a letter from Ernest Crosby and the above mentioned letter from Tolstoy, and informs his uncle of the value of that letter. The second letter is from Benedict Prieth to Philip B. Townley, again forwarding the same Tolstoy letter and pointing to its unusual dates; he asks Townley to retain it for safekeeping.The portrait is in blue and white pencil and crayon by L. L. Tolstoi (Tolstoy's son), drawn from memory on January 2, 1922, in Paris. It bears an inscription and the signature of the younger Tolstoy on the verso. The manuscript copy of Tolstoy's Kreĭt︠s︡erova sonata, which is based on Ludwig van Beethoven's "Kreutzer sonata," is a hectograph process reproduction of a handwritten text in Russian. This copy (109 pp., 29 x 19.1 cm.) bears the inscription of N. Simonov and the date 1890 on p.1 of the wrapper.

  • Leo Tolstoy Collection

    The collection consists of correspondence by and about Tolstoy, a portrait of Tolstoy, and a copy of Tolstoy's Kreĭt︠s︡erova sonata. There is a signed autograph letter from Tolstoy to Benedict L. Prieth, Princeton Class of 1891, dated January 30 - February 12, 1907, concerning the death of Ernest Howard Crosby, the American author and friend of Tolstoy. The letter is written in English from his father's estate, "Yasnaya Polyana"" There are two other letters regarding Tolstoy's letter to Prieth. The first is from Eberhard L. Faber, Princeton Class of 1915, dated November 20, 1925. In his letter, Faber forwards to his uncle, Benedict Prieth, a letter from Ernest Crosby and the above mentioned letter from Tolstoy, and informs his uncle of the value of that letter. The second letter is from Benedict Prieth to Philip B. Townley, again forwarding the same Tolstoy letter and pointing to its unusual dates; he asks Townley to retain it for safekeeping.The portrait is in blue and white pencil and crayon by L. L. Tolstoi (Tolstoy's son), drawn from memory on January 2, 1922, in Paris. It bears an inscription and the signature of the younger Tolstoy on the verso. The manuscript copy of Tolstoy's Kreĭt︠s︡erova sonata, which is based on Ludwig van Beethoven's "Kreutzer sonata," is a hectograph process reproduction of a handwritten text in Russian. This copy (109 pp., 29 x 19.1 cm.) bears the inscription of N. Simonov and the date 1890 on p.1 of the wrapper.

  • Malcolm Cowley Collection Related to The Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald

    The collection consists of related correspondence, typescripts, editorial notes, and galley proofs for The Stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald, A Selection of 28 Stores, published by Charles Scribner's Sons in 1951, which Cowley edited and introduced. There are typescripts (some carbon copies), mostly with autograph corrections and additions, of the outline, table of contents, and editorial notes for each of the four chapters of the book, and galley proofs of the introduction, the editorial notes, and the epilogue.The correspondence is chiefly with publisher Charles Scribner and editor Wallace Meyer. In a letter dated October 7, 1949, Scribner proposes the idea of the book to Cowley after having discussed it with Cowley's agent, Harold Ober. There is also a letter from Meyer dated October 10, 1950, on planning the dust jacket and the title of the book. (The original title was "A Selection of 27 Short Stories.") The rest of the correspondence is between Cowley and Fitzgerald biographer Arthur Mizener, who was also preparing a book on Fitzgerald"s unpublished short stories.

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